The Deep Secret, of the Puerto Rican Day Parade

War Against All Puerto Ricans: Revolution and Terror in America’s Colony
 

In the 1950s, Puerto Ricans often found themselves unwelcome in New York City – and elsewhere in the US – as they tried to carve out a place for themselves and their families. Sometimes beaten by their neighbors, or by the police, they were given the lowest-paying jobs and the worst housing in the city.

And so, in 1958, Puerto Rican leaders decided to hold a modest parade where they could march  with pride through the heart of Manhattan.

Fathers taught their children…by pointing to floats dedicated to Puerto Rican towns known for sugarcane, coffee, tobacco, plantains and pineapples. 

Mothers tapped their feet…to the bombas, plenas and aguinaldos that evoked memories of their island childhood.

By 1966, the parade was already a “must do” event for national celebrities and politicians.
 

 
Today, the parade is a star-studded TV spectacle with 90,000 marchers, 2 million spectators and a horde of corporate sponsors. Marc Anthony, J.Lo, Ricky Martin, Victor Cruz, and Mayor Michael Bloomberg have all “starred” in it.
 

 
But even as the National Puerto Rican Day Parade has become one of the nation’s largest and best-known outdoor celebrations, there is a secret that few people suspect…a secret that reaches into the heart of every Puerto Rican, without their even knowing it.

It is the secret of the Puerto Rican flag.

Have you ever noticed the passionate, over-the-top, surrealistic display of Puerto Rican flags at every Puerto Rican Day Parade?  

Everywhere you look, it is an ocean of flags!

Block after block, you see this:
 

 
And this:
 

 
And this:
 

 
And even this: 
 

 
This is no accident.

There is a reason for this emotional attachment.

There is a reason why Que Bonita Bandera and Preciosa bring tears to our eyes…and sometimes we don’t even know why.

It is because this flag represents an ideal…the ideal of lost youth and forgotten illusions…much like last night’s dream or the prayers we once heard, at our grandmothers’ feet. 

But there is one more reason, why this flag is the emotional heart of the parade.

It is the secret which explains everything.

We are crazy about this flag because for many years, any Puerto Rican who owned one, would go to jail for ten years.

WHEN OWNING A FLAG WAS A FELONY

For many years, the United States wanted only one flag in Puerto Rico.

Here is that flag, in the inauguration of the first US Governor of Puerto Rico, in April 1900:
 

 
Pedro Albizu Campos refused to salute this flag.

In order to crush Don Pedro and the Nationalist movement, a law was passed in 1948, right after Don Pedro got out of jail.

It was called Public Law 53, and also known as La Ley de la Mordaza…the Gag Law.

Law 53 made it a felony to sing a song, whistle a tune, or utter one word against the US government, or in favor of Puerto Rican independence.

This included singing La Borinqueña, or owning a Puerto Rican flag.

Own a flag…ten years in jail.
 

 
Every day, the FBI and Insular Police raided people’s homes, searched for flags, and hauled Puerto Ricans off to jail.

In many cases the flag – all by itself – was the sole piece of evidence.

Own a flag…ten years in jail
 

 
They did it all over the island.

In November 1950, they arrested 3,000 Puerto Ricans within one week!

Some of them were only eight years old.
 

 
Public Law 53 was passed in 1948. 

Even though it violated the US constitution, it took nine years to repeal it, in 1957.  The very next year, in 1958, the first Puerto Rican Day Parade was held in New York City.

The flags and celebration were everywhere. The passion was astonishing. New York had never seen anything like it.

The Puerto Rican Day parade exploded into New York City, with the emotion and power of an entire people…who had finally found a voice…for one day on Fifth Avenue. 

The U.S. politicians couldn’t explain it, but they did know one thing…that they better get in front of it, and yell “¡Que viva Puerto Rico!”

That much they did understand.

And so, the deep secret of the Puerto Rican Day Parade is this: 

The parade was born in the hearts of an entire nation…where every person was declared a criminal…if they dared to show their flag.

Que bonita bandera

Que bonita bandera

Que bonita bandera es la bandera Puertorriqueña

¡ QUE VIVA PUERTO RICO !

 

For a history of the War Against All Puerto Ricans, read the book…

War Against All Puerto Ricans: Revolution and Terror in America’s ColonyBuy it Now

 

Si prefiere ver la página web en español por favor visite: http://www.guerracontratodoslospuertorriquenos.com</span

158 Comments on “The Deep Secret, of the Puerto Rican Day Parade

  1. Well i am carrying puerto rico’s blood in my veins…I am so proud to be puerto rican

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  3. But still there are a lot of Puerto Ricans that don’t know these facts and don’t care to learn about our struggle and our beautiful culture. And some are so against independence that they don’t care to learn what it is all about. Despierta Boricua!!

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  4. I am married to a native Puerto Rican. For years, my husband has told me of the struggles and strife; how the United States treats Puerto Rico like a natural resource to be pillaged, regardless of what happens to her people. I look forward to the day when Puerto Rico takes her place as a Sovereign State in the United Nations. I look forward to visiting the island. I am proud to say that I am married to a Puerto Rican.

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  5. Que viva Puerto Rico . Tenemos derecho a ser puertorriqueños. Con que derecho nos quieren cuartar nuestro nuestro derecho de ser de Puerto Rico.

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  6. Hola me llamo Pablo Boricuasburnin ,
    Nací Ponciano..1958.. criado acá “SF Bay area ” llegando a viejo sé la historia y el cuento de mi BANDERA Preciosa .. it has given me a true vision of my heritage ..mis sangre de veras.. as the youngest of four with starting a completely different form of life here in California 1960..identity crisis x10. isolaton that is not to comprehend for most of mi gente boricus..lost in my life living this isolated existence were big chunks of Los cuentos de mi país ..
    BORIKEŃ… really did understand til recently the history, las Estoria nuestra ,thanks muchisimo for this article,that my frist memory of the TV didn’t come til middle of grade school Where the enlightenment of my heritage started & not till my return to COUNTRY ,Perla del caribe,35 yrs later.. to my estonishmont I felt immediately I was home.. and for the now &the foreseeable further I’ll be calling mi tiera “Puetorrico “my home.. with all my God blessing of health and longevity I will be catching up, Protecting and living mi vida
    BORRICANO. QUE VIVA BORINKIN….
    LIBRE INDEPENDIENTE SORBERANO!!!

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  7. Back in 1953, I believe, there was a gentleman who was jailed for three months for flying the Puerto Rican flag from the balcony of his home in Orocovis, in central Puerto Rico. Once he returned home from jail, he painted a huge Puerto Rican flag at the side wall of his home. “I dare them to take away THIS one,” he said. It is still painted there.

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  8. Que hermosa expresion sobre porque amamos, valoramos y repetamos nuestra bandera, porque ella encierra nuestra razon de ser, nuestra puertorriqueñidad , todo aquello que quisierieron silenciar como pueblo y que nunca han podido. “Ondeando por el cielo veo volando mi bandera y orgulloso yo me siiento de mi solutaria estrella.”

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  9. THIS CULTURAL ACHIEVEMENT WILL DEMONSTRATE THE ENTIRE NATION, THAT PUERTO RICO AS A STATE OF THE UNION, HAS OUTSTANDING VALUES AND PATRIOTISM TO BRING AN DISTINGUISH CONTRIBUTION TO THE AMERICAN FLAG, WHEN THE STAR OF OUR FLAG IS INCORPORATED TO THE HONORABLE ACTUAL FIFTY STARS IN OUR NATIONS FLAG.

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  10. I see and read so many stories my heart is between anger and pride. But something I must say and have been saying for some time now. The north nation wich invaded us in the Hispanic American war is not AMERICA. America is constituted by all countries from the top of North America, central and south america. The US has not only invaded every single state they have and their territories but they also invade the name wich represents them. They should be called american statesmen and statewomen, that’s the true name or clarification. Let’s be more conscious of what we say and how we say it even why we are saying it. To call a united statesman an American as a whole and solemne description is yet another invation we let them do. We fir being borikuas from Boriké are already Americans before Columbus arrived and Americo Vespuccio. We were Americans since we were Arawack, Igneris, kaligano,locono and many more indigenous races that made the Borikua. I apretiate this post and the information given. Knowledge is power. But please let ones and for all start to practice the knowledge of history and act in accordance to that history. “Don’t know your past. Won’t know your future.” A Peruvian is an American, an Argentinian is an American , a Canadian is an American and yes united statesmen are American but not only people’s from the US. The US has nothing to do with the union of the Americas, the dream of Simon Bolivar. Instead they have kept us dispersed as if we were all diferent. We are all Americans from Canada to Chile. Not just the US. To see the US as the soul representation of America is a fallacy for they are all nation made from inglish emigrants as we all know. A nation created by invation wich bred all types of people. Good and bad. Wise and ignorants. Racist and none racist. As well as we should know the history of our parade and flag. We should also know what an American really is. I know this is not the subject but I read so much saying American when they mean united statesman or woman. Let’s call things as they are focused on true history. Not politics or any kind of fanatism. It’s that fanatism wich devided us in the beginning. Now I leave this thought. Imagine what we can do if the same pride on going out on our day parade we gave to our real issues. What if? We united in a common idea to protect ourselves from more than 100 years of invation, rape, colonialism and lies. Imagine borikuas united in Peace asking for peace,equality, and true freedom. We are powerful yet we forget.

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  11. Pingback: The Puerto Rican Parade | [un]Common Sense

  12. My name is lil Tito (1000%) BORICUA. Born and raised on the “Lower East Side Ave. D”. PROUD TO BE PUERTO RICAN. LOVE MY HERITAGE AND MY PEOPLE. May GOD always bless my country and all the other countries as well. There’s nothing in this world like being Puerto Rican and walking with Christ. Thank you Jesus for loving us all. May God bless all all of you. Seek Jesus and watch him change your life.

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  13. U know ur right when u hold that flag in ur hands something goes through ur body, it’s diffrent feelings all at once all good.
    I am a nyrican born in Brooklyn and as long as I could remember my mother making acapurias, rejEnos de Papas and sandwiches with Kool aid Brite and early and sit us down on the side walk to watch this parade.
    Oh and when it started we love to sing que Bonito bandera.
    I was born in 1954 and lived all that prejudice we lived calling us spices, by this time we lived in the the village right down the street of St Vincents hospital. When I first saw Rita Moreno in Westside Story I said wow that was us in that movie, I could identify with this movie it was so on point I cried.
    And I started taking my kids to the parade as infants up until they were 16 and 14 then they went with their friends and we would meet up in front of St Patrick Cathedral.
    Then they started with their own family’s till this day.
    I love my people and our culture que viva Puerto Rico always and our flag

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  14. Gracias por tan importante declaración, no sabía que de esta forma fue que nació la parada puertoriqueña.Me emocione al leer esta verdad que representa a un pueblo que luchó por unos derechos y la vergüenza de un pueblo opresor que no quería compartir una tierra de la cual ellos mismos fueron quienes le arrebataron a los indios americanos; estoy completamente ORGULLOSO de mi Bandera y de ser llamado BORICUA….siii….”PA QUE TU LO SEPAS”….

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  15. WHY HE IS PROUD==BEAUTIFUL ISLAND. I SEE A BEAUTIFUL WOMAN AND I GO AFTER HER FOR BEAUTY, NOT HER CAR, HER JOB OR BANK BOOK. WE ARE GOVERNED BY MYRIAD HORMONES, ABOVE ALL, THE NEED TO REPRODUCE. IN BED, BOTH, MAN N WOMEN WILL ENGINEER, IF U ALLOW ME, THAT ATTRACTION OF BEAUTY N HORMONES.TO REINFORCE THEIR MUTUAL INTEREST–LOVE–I HAD A JOB, HIGH SCHOOL TEACHER WHEN I LEFT THE ISLAND LAST. I GO BACK TO ENJOY ITS BEAUTY N ITS PEOPLE. OF COURSE, THERE ARE PROBLEMS IN P.R. BUT MY COMPATRIOT, LOOK AROUND IN NEW YORK CITY, LONDON, PARIS, LA. MEXICO D.F. BUENOS AIRES, CARACAS. RIO DE JANEIRO NOT TO MENTION YIHADISTS INTHE MIDDLE EAST. PUERTO RICO IS A PARADISE, A BLESSING FROM ABOVE. THERE PLACES IN P.R. WHERE U CAN GRAB BANANAS, ORANGES, MANGOES,COCONUTS, UVAS PLAYERAS N FISH, ALL FREE OF CHARGE IF TRUST PUERTO RICAN HOSPITALITY N FRIENDSHIP. ENJOY THE ISLAND BEFORE CLIMATE CHANGE HARMS IT.

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  16. This is the second time I read this interesting and highly educational article.I spent most of my life span in Brooklyn, N.Y. I was born in 5/1930. I was born and raised out in the country. There was a law in Pto Rico that we must speak English at home although there were no English speaking people around.My father imposed on us a beautiful ruling that said: I was born a Spanish citizen, I speak Spanish, therefore, this is my land, and Spanish is the only language to be spoken in this house. That was his public pronouncement; what was not publicly known or revealed was a letter like, signed by PATRIOTA Jose de Diego. I ended up knowing neither English or good Spanish because it was not taught in schools. QUE BONITA BANDERA MEANS PUERTO RICANS HAVE ALWAYS BEEN HEROIC, BEAUTIFUL AND HAPPY PEOPLE. See Galeria de Heroes de Puerto Rico by this author.

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  17. The most giving loving people? You obviously having been to North Philadelphia. Most of my people live in lala land and do not see how bad Puerto Rico really is. Ask a Puerto Rican why he is proud of being PR and they will get into a two spew about how beautiful the Island. Not once do they mention the important things like jobs or medical.

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  18. My Great grandmother God rest her soul was pure taino. I was blessed enough to have laid my eyes and connected to this legend of my family. We are from the mountains and know how to survive. I am great full to the US for our living, however, my people, don’t be fooled. There are so many racist individuals who don’t like to see us do good, but como Calle 13 says, el que se mete con mi jente me cae mal. We are the most giving loving people, but u mess with us, you’re cursed by our ancestors. Stay together such as educating and sharing like this board for instance. Let us always be a good people as we’ve been since the day of the boriqua. Blessings

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  19. iam so happy to know all about this i did not know i will pass it on thank you very much

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  21. Colonialism is an act of violence, this is why the United Nations call for an end to it. Colonialism not only robs a people of their freedom but it also violates their soul and sense of self. This history is not taught in an effort to keep us loyal and faithful to the very system that rapes our land and our people. The good people of the USA were also manipulated in the name of cooperate greed. I pray we may continue to learn that we are all one and that survival depends more on respect and cooperation then in conquest, divisions and competition.

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  22. Mil gracias por compartir la hermosa historian de puerto Rico naci y me crie en new York y puerto Rico tengo mi nene y mi nena que me Dan las gracias por haberte naci do en puerto Rico yo termite mi escuelamsuperior en rincon pr y estudie enfermeria luego mi ex ingress en el army done venci obstacles y mi Orgullo que gane la electionde school bord member at large la primer a Latina en fort Stewart ga mi Orgullo es tango de ser puertoriquena y mi nombre esta en washington que viva puerto Rico

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  23. ISRAEL CABALLERO BAYAMON THANKS FOR DA LIT ON MY FLAG AND FAMILY ITS GOOD TO KNOW WE STAND STRONG FOR WHAT WE LOVE OUR ISLA DEL ENCANTO!

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  24. Cynthia cruz
    Born and raised in buffalo n.y.
    Proud too be a Puerto Rican ..,,

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  25. 100% Boricua de Ponce, Gracias por toda la informacion.

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  26. I marched in 1958 in the first Puerto Rican Day parade along with my sister and childhood friends. Of course it wasnt any where near what it is today. We formed a group in Brooklyn (Trinity Church) led by a woman named Sra. Rivera. I too was born in El Barrio (110 & 2nd ave) but raised in the Red Hook section of Brooklyn. My parents were born and raised in Mayaguez, Puerto Rico and came here in the late 40’s. Its so odd that we Puerto Rican’s were so hated when we came here especially NYC) because this is our country as Native Americans. I recently saw fit to explore my Ancestral Roots and had my DNA tested. I found that we Puerto Ricans have the same gene that identifies American Indians and that can be traced pretty much to all the Virgin Islands. American Indians migrated from all over this country and some came together as the Iroquis Nation. Made up of several different tribes in New York State. We carry their blood in our veins as well. I now live in Cincinnati, Ohio and as can be expected, there are very few Puerto Ricans here. On the 4th of July, I fly my PR flag. I really could care less what anyone thinks. I am PR first and American second and Im proud of it. Show your pride as PR’s and dont allow anyone to make you less than.

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  27. Great and interesting information. I was raised in the states and returned to Puerto Rico to raise my own family and at that point in history it was a great decision. I love being Puertorrican.

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  28. Hello and thank you for this great but sad article. I am Puerto Rican “by marriage”! (My ancestry is Germanic with a bit of Austrian, Scottish and Northern Irish in too.) I was born in 1951, so I would not have been able to argue intelligently why, back in those years, having a Puerto Rican flag was punishable by jail time, when other ethnic groups displayed their flags on their porches, and in parades. Also, the 1st Amendment right of free speech is given to all Americans. One could argue that a Puerto Rican – American’s right of free speech was being violated if Puerto Rican- Americans were not allowed to be in possession of their own flag. Very strange law, very strange thinking. But thank God the stupid law was repealed. And in my opinion, the best Broadway musical of all time, WEST SIDE STORY, was a result of the angst and prejudice that Puerto Rican- Americans had to endure. God bless them and Puerto Rico.

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  29. My Mother Senor Francisca Betancourt -Pabon. From Rio Piedra’s Puerto Rico. Had 4 children born in Puerto Rico. Anyway I was born in Manhattan 110 Convent Ave. Kincerbocker Hospital. Born 1954. My Mom would introduce myself to her friends and would always say My daughter was born here in the United States. That was such a bi g deal to her. Honestly I would have loved to have been born en Mi Orguyo Puerto Rico. That would have been a dream come through for me. Don’t get me wrong. I live the United States of America. But my Heart will always be with Puerto Rico. I taught my children and grandchildren to be Proud to be Peuerto Rican. WEPA. Que Viva Puerto Rico simepre
    Ms. Patricia Ann Betancourt.

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  30. Thank you for that touching story……I Will luv this flag forever and always…much luv to my Puerto Rican family!

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  31. I read the comments and feel pride for my people but at the same time feel deep sadness for the burden that colonialism has imposed on my people, forcing more than half of our nationals to leave Puerto Rico. I don’t know how to translate the word “desarraigo” but it’s very painful to perceive it in my people. ¡Viva Puerto Rico Libre!

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  32. La pura verdad! No hay duda de eso… A nosotros digo a mis padres se la hicieron de cuadritos! Aunque haya yo nacido allí a mi tambien experimente lo que se hablo aqui! Cierto por demas….

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  33. Proud to be Puerto Rican……The Puerto Rican flag is beautiful How I remember we come long ways my parents are from Mayaquez moved to Bronx in 1950s then they moved to Milwaukee.. -we as well had our share of parades.

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  34. I thank you for this post…..I hope more of our youth is reading this and more….I was born in the island and brought here when I was about 10….not a lot of History taught in school, so I am always interested in getting anything I can get my hands on to learn about my culture, my people, my roots……

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  35. Gracias por compartir esta historia los Boricua siempre hemos sido unos guerreros y defendemos nuestra bandera.

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  36. now I understand why my parents were very protective we’ve come a long way

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  37. I was born in Mayaguez PR…came to Brooklyn when I was 3….then we moved to NJ and lived with mostly non-Puerto-Ricans….there was prejudice and internal racism as well (for which I take full responsibility). But when I was about 16yrs. old I was asked to be on a float at the PR parade in Newark…. I felt pride for the first time based on my heritage….it was short lived, and it took a while ,but eventually I realized that the GIFT of my Puerto Rican heritage and the endowment of the talents of my parents and grandparents and all those before them has helped to make me who I am. For this I am grateful. Your explanation of why the flag is so significant touched me. I am going to make sure that I display my flag with more pride from now on. I am an American and I love my country, but my island is a part of this country and I will not allow anyone to diminish my heritage ever again! Thank you.

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  38. I am so happy that I learn something more about my history…..I am so glad to be a Puerto Rican!

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  39. Que bonita bandera, que bonita bandera, que bonita bandera es la bandera puertorriqueña.

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  40. Growing up in Brooklyn NYC as a Puerto Rican , my experience was disrespect Boriquas in the 70s and 80s would definetly lead to your ass getting beatdown. I grew up middle class around the unknown middle class Puerto rican that has always existed. There was a race war riot between ol skool italians and Puerto Ricans in the early 70’s in park slope brooklyn, the puerto ricans won but the cops would retaliate.Always remember Puerto Ricans are not submissive never have been and will never be. Good hearted yes we are.

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  41. Si ven las fotos, ven que hay banderas con azul mas claro y otro oscuro. El verdadero color es el azul añil o sea el azul mas claro. El azul oscuro es de Texas y no es de Puerto Rico. Se colo entre la bandera Puertorriqueña. Asi que de ahora en adelante ya saben cual bandera comprar para honrar nuestra verdadera bandera Puertorriquena. Gracias.

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  42. I did not know the history but I really appreciate this article! Que bandera bonita! Que Viva Puerto Rico!!!!!

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  43. I hear you, But the sad thing is that there are some Puerto Ricans are also into the way of American life and have nothing in common to those that are still Struggling in the American way of life and not wanted by the white anglos of this country. We have so many Puerto Ricans Veteran in this country that are eignor by the white Supremacists in the All Job Markets in this country. Things are not going to change as long as the Supremacists in Washington are in control and taking care of those people just to get their votes too maintained their Status in Puerto Rico White Majority Rules and the Struggle in Puerto Rico will continue. Don’t be fooled
    That is way Puerto Rico Will Not become a state while the Island’s Government is controlled by Washington so the people of Puerto Rico will continue to be slaves same since 1898 and before that by Spain. That is the legacy of the people Of Boriqua,As long as they continue to Put your food in that Table by Washington., It does matter whether you are White, Black, Red, or Taino Indians. While the U.S. and Washington is in control and The WORD IS SALVES BY ANY COLOR, Will Continue in Borinquen.

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  44. Born in NY in 1952 and raised in “The Bronx”. My mother is from Lares, my father form Morovis and married a man for Ceiba. At the age of 6 I remember having a special need friend whom I protected very much. Her mother would take me to her house to play but I always had to leave before her father arrived. One day he arrived unexpectedly and when he realized I was a “Spic” he grabbed me by the arm and placed me out the door in a very violent fashion. First experience of many… All my life I have been worked hard at changing ignorant perception of whom we are. I had passed our traditions to my children and grandkids. Three Kings Day, Pasteles, limber and sofrito, and even though the last three generations were born in the States, we ALL speak Spanish. Not too long ago my young granddaughter was asked what she was. Her response was “I’m a Hispanican”. Maybe she is on to something.

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  45. My dad was sitting in a car, I’d say back in 1973-4 a police officer taps on his side of the window told him to get out of the car, My father gets out the car asked “why are you asking me to get out?” I’m not doing nothing wrong. Police officer told him cause you’re a spic! and beat him so bad he ended up in the hospital, walked out after regaining his conscious, My father was scared to report this, and of course to who? Years later the same cop was arrested for beating another latin, by this time Latinos were fighting back, the officer was charged, my dad read it in the newspaper, no one believed it or didn’t dare to believe it, BUT Here we are today. Celebrating our culture in all parts of N.Y.C speak up!

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  46. My dad was sitting in a car, I’d say back in 1973-4 a police officer taps on his side of the window told him to get out of the car, My father gets out the car asked “why are you asking me to get out?” I’m not doing nothing wrong. Police officer told him cause you’re a spicy! and beat him so bad he ended up in the hospital, and walked out after regaining his conscious,My father was scared to report this,and if course to who? Years,later same cop arrested for beating another latin, by then Latinos were fighting back, he was charged, my dad read it in the newspaper and almost, no one believed it or didn’t dare to believe it, Here we are today. Celebrating our culture in all parts of N.Y.C speak up!

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  47. When my grandparents came to NYC for a better life , my grandfather faced so much racism. He worked so hard to try to support his family and keep his sanity but it was very difficult at that time for that generation. My fathers cousin that was born in PR Barceloneta, El Piche Bajo would tell me how she saw her uncles come home from work sometimes on payday beat up and robbed of their weeks pay.
    The beating up subsided because enough was enough , but some men turned to alcohol to mend the humiliation of being called Spics.
    My grandfather surpassed all of those obstacles and worked so hard to.support his family and get them ahead that he became a big boss in NYCHA and my grandmother was a seamstress. They both spoke , wrote and understood the English language well. So I am proud of them. They raised me and I am proud to be a Puerto Rican American. !

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  48. Always great to have a history lesson. I was born in Puerto Rico (Arecibo) and came to the mainland when I was 6. My father did not go to NYC but to the suburbs of Chicago. Imagine being one of a handful of families in a 98% European American town and going to a Catholic school. No ESL, not allowed to speak a word of Spanish, no one that wanted to rent to you, no places that allowed you to eat there. Yes, it was tough but we survived and now at the young age of 60 with a myriad of experiences through a variety of corporate jobs in mainly white corporations I realize that despite the challenges, there is always someone that has it worse. Family and our culture helped to keep us going – as more and more people from the island came – we had our own parties, bought homes, assimilated, inter-married and survived.

    I did not have the same experience as those PR’s that lived in Chicago/NYC in mostly Hispanic neighborhoods, I have no accent but I visit the island, have always claimed my PR heritage and have tried to educate my fellow American’s about the Puerto Rican American in their midst. The majority knows so little history and geography – guess they were napping when it was taught in history class :)….so whether brown, black, red, yellow or polk dottted…I have tried to educate those about the small island in the Caribbean, the Spanish American War, the spoils of war and our unique “commonwealth” standing. Yes, we come from an indigenous people, Tainos, mixed with African, European (Spanish, Dutch, French) even Asian (they came to build the railroad in PR) and we continue to mix, assimilate, acculturated (sp) ourselves into a variety of groups while still being proud of our roots…Boricua’s – and our flag, and yes, our lovely island….Que Viva Puerto Rico

    Liked by 1 person

  49. I am sorry that you find so little to appreciate, in your own heritage. But I certainly hope that this changes. There is much to appreciate and treasure.

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  50. M. Velasquez,

    I had to learn it myself! They don’t teach this history. We have to research and build it, brick by brick.

    But we will. They will not take our history away from us.

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  51. I live in Puerto Rico and in Levittown, Toa Baja, the founder of the Puerto Rican Day Parade, Agapito, is still alive and well. He tells the story to anyone who wants to sit in his bar in Ave. Dos Palmas (that avenue has recently been renamed with his name). Great Article.

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  52. rn in Puerto Rico and raised in the United States in the state of New Jersey although I love this country for everything is Stan my first love and my first passion is my island my heritage my deep roots my family my pride and my people in that order… Listen to all music and to watch other people and their culture and our children and our lives continue the culture in present-day sounding amount of prise always keeps my head up high and shoulders back. God bless the island of my birth…nd people of my culture. …….WEPAAAAA

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  53. I never new why so many Puertoricans would hang they’re flag.This is very interesting! My grandparents on my dads side are from Puertorico, and I’ve always wanted to visit the beautiful island of my heritage. I would also like to visit Mexico since I’m Puertorican and Mexican also. I get this alot from people! ( I thought Puertoricans and Mexicans didn’t like eachother!) Haha. In my eyes we’re all created equal and I’m very proud to be a latin American.

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  54. YES I REMEMBER, I WAS BORN IN EL BARRIO (E 102 ST) AND I WAS IN THE AIR FORCE WHEN MY SISTER AND AN ACTIVIST, GENERA VALINTIN PUT TOGETHER (1957) THE FIRST P.R. PARADE ON 3RD AVE FROM 102ST TO 110ST.

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  55. lets not forget we are also from the greatest nation The United States of America!!!! If not for this we would not have this parade at all!!!!!!🇺🇸🇺🇸🇺🇸🇺🇸🇺🇸🇺🇸🇺🇸

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  56. Llegue a N.Y. En el año 1958 Soy Cayeyano de pura sepa y no hay un solo Dia que no extrañe mi bella Isla!!!!Mi Bandera es mi Orgullo donde quiera que me pare!!WEPAAA

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  57. Fascinating truth that more need to share.

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  58. All fine and dandy when read on a Web site but in real life here in North Philly these so called Puerto Ricans put up the flag and leave it up until it is faded, shredded and unrecognizable. My parents were Puerto Ricans and I am an American born in the USA. My allegiance is to this country. I always ask what is it that makes them proud to be PR and the answer always is because it is beautiful. So are many parts of America. Never do I get an economical, educational response. I was born in 1950 and am old enough to see many of the things PR have done here and it limited considering that they have had 65 years to accomplish something. I have seen many sale their vote than vote responsibly. As welfare dwindled they quickly establish SSI to replace. Many refuse to learn English and now it was be considered a disability and an eligibility for Social Security. I can go on but what’s the use.

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  59. I was always proud of being Puerto Rican and take pride in our flag, never knew the history of the flag. Very interesting. Love my people, food, music, island and most of all my flag. Que viva P.R

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  60. Which flag are you talking about? The flag with the light blue triangle, or the one with the dark blue triangle?

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  61. I PRAYED TO GOD WHEN I WAS 11 YEARS OLD THAT HE WOULD LET ME REPRESENT THE PUERTO RICANS AND HISPANICS THRU MUSIC..I WAS INVOLVED WITH MUSIC SINCE I WAS A CHILD. MY MOTHER ENCOURAGED ME AND WANTED ME TO BE INVOLVED WITH MUSIC BECAUSE SHE SAW IT IN ME. IN MY EARLY YEARS I HAD BEEN AWARE OF THE DISCRIMINATION TOWARD THE PUERTO RICIAN PEOPLE, AND DID NOT UNDERSTAND IT. I WOULD ALWAYS BUY THE ” HIT PARADE ” MAGAZINE IN ORDER TO LEARN THE NEW SONGS THAT CAME OUT…ONE DAY I WAS LOOKING AT A NEWS STAND WHEN I SAW FOR THE FIRST TIME A SONG MAGAZINE FOR BLACK SINGERS ..??? WHAT WAS THAT ABOUT ?? THERE WERE SONG BOOKS FOR WHITES AND ONE FOR BLACKS…BUT NONE FOR THE HISPANICS ? I SAID IN MY MIND..WHERE IS THE ONE FOR THE PUERTO RICANS OR SPANISH? THIS IS WHEN I MADE MY PETITION !! I FELT THAT THE MUSIC WOULD HELP BIND US AS ONE FAMILY…BECAUSE MUSIC IS LOVE. IN 1950 THE MAMBO ERA BEGAN IN NEW YORK CITY AND EVERYONE WAS LEARNING TO DANCE IT. I HAD ALREADY LEARNED TO TAP DANCE SO IT WAS EASY FOR ME.IN 1951 I DECIDED TO MAKE A MAMBO GROUP IN MY BLOCK. I HAD NO SCHOOLING IN THIS, BUT I DECIDED TO PLAY THE ” TIMBALES ” DRUMS. MY GROUP QUICKLY BECAME A TEN PIECE ORCHESTRA ! I SOON STARTED TO PLAY IN ALL THE BOROS OF NEW YORK CITY ! BY 1953 I STARTED PLAYING AT THE PALLADIUM BALLROOM ON BROADWAY…IT HAS BEEN LIKE A MIRACLE…GOD DOES ANSWER PRAYERS. THIS YEAR MAKES 64 YEARS OF MY INVOLVEMENT IN MUSIC…I HAVE REPRESENTED ALL PEOPLE WITH MY MUSIC. IN 1959 I REPRESENTED THE UNITED STATES ARMY ON THE ” ED SULLIVAN SHOW “.THE REST IS HISTORY !! AMEN !!!

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  62. wow I didn’t know that thank you for the history much love to our people and much respect to the old timers that had to endure that life but now we just continue with pride and love que viva Puerto Rico Por erencia de mis padres wepaaaaaaa boricua soy Caguas 🇵🇷❤️

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  63. WOW. I was a little girl when we proudly paraded down the streets of New York with our Puertorican Flags and sang ‘Que Bonita Bandera’ but was too young to know or understand the truth behind it all. Now it makes so much sense, I saw the passion in the adults around me but didn’t understand. Now in my 50’s I learn this very important part of my history as a 1st generation New Yorker. Thank You for the knowledge. 😌

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  64. American and conservative..no foreign wars for the globalist a or socialists..retain our culture and most of all no Statehood. Preserve our uniqueness!

    Louis Diaz Mill Valley,CA

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  65. Is a great memories the first one i went i was 4 years know I have 53
    My mom went before I was born how bless we are Thank you Jesus Bless Puerto Rico and Puertorican

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  66. Ty for this post. Makes me more proud to be Puerto Rican. Love my flag. represent for culture . teach our youth.

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  67. Qe. Horgullo. Para. Cualqier. Orgullosa. Pr. Me. Encanta Mi Bella Bandera Y Mi Bella Gente Qe Dios Nos Bendiga a Todos Y Recuerda Para. Alante Siempre En La union Esta La fuerza😆😆😆😆😆😆

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  68. DESDE LA INVASION NORTEAMRICANA A PUERTO RICO EN 1898 NOS HAN CONVERTIDO EN UN EXPERIMENTO EN TODAS LAS FACETAS DE NUESTRAS VIDAS. POSIBLEMENTE LA MAS CRUEL ES JUGAR CON NUESTRAS CONSIENCIAS PONIENDONOS A PELEAR HEMANOS CONTRA HERMANOS HACIENDO CREER QUE BAJO UNA COLONIA PODAMOS SER IGUALES O MEJORES QUE ELLOS SIN ACASO TENER LOS PODERES DE UN PAIS LIBRE COMO LO SON ELLOS. NO ESTAMOS EN CONTRA DE ALGUNA PERSONA NORTEAMERICANA, ESTAMOS EN CONTRA DE LA POLITICA DE ESE PAIS SOBRE NUESTRA PATRIA. SI ELLOS ESTAN ORGULLOSOS DE SUS ACTOS EN UN PAIS LIBRE, NOSOTROS QUEREMOS TAMBIEN TENER NUESTRA PATRIA LIBRE Y SOBERANA CON ORGULLO Y AMISTAD CON EL RESTO DEL MUNDO.

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  69. I was born and raised in New York City where people fool themselves into thinking things have really changed when they actually haven’t – bias is just expressed in more sophisticated and latent ways. I picked up this book last month and though I was aware of many of the things covered, I found it an excellent (and required) read.

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  70. Es bonito ver Nuestra bandera y todos los puertorriqueños celebrando pero serial bonito qué la puedan televisar en algun canal.como hacen con otras parades ya qué no todo el.mundo puede viajar a NY a verla en persona.

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  71. Great watching the PR parade from my residence in Puerto Rico. Beautiful article. My family moved to NY back in the 50’s and we watched how they were treated, some good and bad times but we survived. We experienced the name calling but other ethnic groups had their own, which I will not mention. Let’s move on with peace on this earth because that is all we have left for the days to come. Viva Puerto Rico!

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  72. Pingback: Vieques shines at the Puerto Rican Day Parade/Vieques brilla en la Parada Puertorriqueña, June 14, 2015 | Vieques Blog

  73. I was born in NY, parents are from Mayaquez, first time I visited P.R, I fell in love with the beautiful island, I always cry to some songs of the island, I’ve volunteered for the National Puerto Rican day parade since 1998, I will continued, till I can’t no more, thanks for this information, I love my Country, people, music.. Que viva Puerto Rico..

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  74. Que Viva Puerto Rico Hoy Mañana y Siempre 💯🇵🇷 Que Bonita Bandera Es La Bandera “PUERTORIQUEÑA”WEPA SOY DE PURA SEPA💯🇵🇷💋💋💋

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  75. I have been living in the states since 1989 I’m from vega Baja and I always carry my Bandera

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  76. My Mother and father are from Yauco, Puerto Rico. They had 10 childred, 5 was born in Puerto Rico and the other 5 in Brooklyn, East New York. We are all 100% proud to be Puerto Rican and New York Ricans. We were poor but we had survived and today we are free to travel back and fourth to our beautiful Puerto Rico Island and our beautiful USA …………. YO SOY BORICUA PA QUE TU LO SEPA!

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  77. Thank you for all that imformation I really enjoy it ..love it .

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  78. I am thankful for the bit of history. I am the product of a Puerto Rican father and African American mother. I am on a quest to learn of my Puerto Rican heritage. After being separated from my dad for 23 yrs we were reunited and spent his last 21 days together. I am grateful to God for giving my brothers an I that priceless opportunity. However, I missed a lot of first hand history from mi narrador. Thanks again

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  79. Soy Jose Morales dorta, edad 85, vine a Nueva York en el 1949. Gracias, QUE BONITA BANDERAEs… Recibimos azotes por la policia montada, palos y otros abusos físicos por los de a pie; pero nunca pensamos en retroceder. La Bandera nos unía como ningun otro símbolo. Que bonita Bandera; En mi Viejo San Juan, Puerto Rico del Alma

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  80. I’m 80 years old born in Caguas P.R. We came to NY in 1955. Was born an American but with a PUERTO RICAN heart.Love my Island and respect my Flagg. QUE Viva P R.

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  81. I am a Native American who is part of the indigenous people of this planet. To be indigenous means that we are part of the original people who first walked this planet; from which all races come! Our origins are from one continent before it was split into the many continents that was at one time called Pangaea! As the continent Pangaea began to split and break apart we indigenous people; a people of color were left on every continent of the world, from Russia to China, to Europe; everywhere all originating from Pangaea and called Afriquiya or Africa which means, “split apart from!” That means that all of us whose origins are clearly from a people of color need to recognize that all have suffered persecution from the slave invaders who took our culture and gave us theirs through their language, dress, religions, food etc. That is why we are sick and in such turmoil; we are confused about who our brothers and sisters are. I remember the story that my father shared with me about what he observed as a member of the U.S. Army Air Corps as an officer in training ( he was a Tuskegee Airman)! He spoke much about how even during World War II in the 40’s, that Puerto Rican troops did not want to be billeted with Black troops because they did not want any association with being black or a people of color! As we were given different names by the European and made to think that we were different; even in his miscegenation through rape and all the rest, we gradually began to loose our identity even to the point that we did not know that we are the Native Americans, known as the Guale, Yamassee who the Spanish Conquistadors found living here when they arrived in this land that used to be called Turtle Island. Part of our doctrine is to embrace all people of color as the remnants of the indigenous peoples who occupied this Earth long before any European came here or even before the European made his appearance only 4004 years ago. We must come to find our common root and come to embrace each other so that we can build our own Kingdom and stop waiting for the European to give us one that he creates only for himself!

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  82. Puerto Ricans had played numerous roles in the American history yet do not get credit for it. Since the Revolution War up to the present, many Puerto Ricans fight for the freedom we take for granted in this country, yet presently we are treated as second class citizens (whatever that may mean). As I have been called a SPIC ever since I can remember, I totally agree because we changed the negative acronym from Spanish People In Custody to the positive acronym Spanish People In Control or my favorite Special Puerto Rican In Control. Puerto Rique~a hasta la muerte and beyond!!!!

    Liked by 1 person

  83. I was 10 years old when we first came to NYC., 1952. We lived on East 14th. Street and Ave C. We were the second Puerto Rican family on the block. We had our problems with the white kids, mostly Polacks and Italians, also the blacks. From 14th street down to 1st, between Ave A and D, it was mostly Puerto Ricans. They tried to fight us, it was a losing battle we were too strong. The blacks were the first ones that, since they couldn’t beat us asked us to join their gang, The Sportsmen, we became the Sportsmen Matadors, then came the Dragons all Puerto Ricans. We were a force to be reckon with. We became fearless, fight anybody that would try to fight us. As a result, got my head busted, 5 stitches fighting the Italians. We kicked their butts. Respect was won.

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  84. I suppose it only stands to reason the wrongs were right in 1957, my birth year. As an Anglo and 36 years with my Puerto Rican wife who came with 4 Brothers and 2 Sisters, Mom & Pop out of Manhattan, I have been blessed with all the extended family and our visits back to Mayaguez. My family cannot even consider life in any other way but the greatness and love of the heritage. We never need a parade to know how special our entire family is. We also will always know of the repression that occurs because of ignorance and injustice. Today is a new day and a new beginning and we must show the love and be the leaders to be looked up to for guidance. Let our conscience be “OUR” guide. Respect to All!

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  85. It’s an interesting article but most of all it represents our roots and how so many Puerto Ricans became part of this country, becoming ours too. Were proud of our heritage just like so many inmigrants who arrived to America hoping to have a better life , we were inmersed due to the Spanish American war, and sice then we obtained our American citizenship and have struggled to be a part of this country through education and hard work. Puerto Ricans offer their lives in so many wars, and are proud of it. Our next step is to become a state in this unios , so that we have true representation and not be in the position of begging for favors!

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  86. What’s the point of a flag without a country? Puerto Rico should be a part of the USA as much as Cuba or DR should be, which is to say it should not. For years the USA has bought and paid for Puerto Rican pride and has repackaged it into a corporate event. Maybe one day the Puerto Rican people will realize that being a second class US citizen has its perks (more money, the chance to have more material things and the best perk of all, the chance to die for American corporate interests in pointless wars all over the world) compared to being just another third world country, but being in charge of your own affairs is priceless and is just
    what the Puerto Rican nation, and all peoples that want to be free deserve.

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  87. I now that am not the only that has its ups and downs in this country, But as a family coming from Puerto Rico in 1952 Living on 182 Street between St Nicholas Ave and audubon Ave. We were the First to live in the area and peaceful it wasn’t because that was Irish Territory, we use to call it El Fanguito and every Saturday @10pm at night about 40 Irish would block us in, But the 50 or so of the Puerto Ricans stood there Grown. This went on every Saturday night during the Summer until one night a Police Officer fire a shot into the air close to the Irish that were blocking the street and ran for cover.After that incident everybody stay in their Block. School wa another Matter. But that is another story for another time. I went to the old Clark JHS in the Bronx where the Latin Kings wanted me to be on their Gang I said no, They stay away from me. We move back to 180 st, Then to 153rd street in 1959. This is a very long story. So I will say this my father was a WW1 Vet, and I did 5 years in the Navy. Here am living in the finger lakes Region for the pass 24 years and push myself not to let people from work change who I am and It has been easy dealing with Suicidal Tendencies for the pass 12 years. I consider myself Damage Goods. But I now that I will be On la playa de Bay in ashes and be happy Again…… Sorry for the long story. And I feel better by writing it with sorrow in my Heart for those that had it worse then me in this so call Free Country. I am 100% Puerto Rican and I hope that one day Puerto Rico will one day get their INDEPENDENCE. Its the BLOOD in our vianes. Sorry for any Misspelled words.

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  88. Very Proud to be Boricua or Puerto Rican. and an American Citizen. I am very happy and proud that our Rita Moreno was the first actress to win an Oscar. Rita Moreno at this time will be recording a CD in Spanish since all the movies and records were in English. She was born in New York and English was her first language. I am very proud of Rita Moreno at the time she became famously known there was a lot racism. Love my Puerto Rican Heritage and have never denied my heritage. When I came to New York from Ponce, Puerto Rico. MY brother register me in the Bronx Catholic school, St Anselms o sea San Anselmo the teachers were Dominican Nuns they were all Irish and started at 7th grade I had just graduated from the 6th grade in Ponce Puerto Rico. I lived in the Bronx our neighborhood was mostly Jews, Greek, Italian. and a few Puerto Rican, I always attended to the festivities of the Greeks and Italian since they were very religious and had the best food and music. I love the Greek men they love to dance with the other men and the ladies were seated watching their men dancing, Also we had the men singing La Paloma in Italian, Greek and Spanish, Those were great days.
    Of course is sad when people change their last name to English. Like from Santiago to St.James and never admit that they are PUERTO RICANS we are born US citizens so why change your last name.
    Que viva Nuestra Bandera Puertorriquena.

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  89. That is a very enlightening part of Puerto Rican culture. Just like that fact that many of the youth & even most adult get upset & even hostile about being called a “SPIC” but can’t tell anyone where it came from. It is not a racist remark. I was created by the NewYork Police department. It stand for.
    S= Spanish
    P= Person
    I= In
    C= Custody
    The amazing thing is how many Boricuas can get offended but couldn’t answer that. Go figure how far we have come as a people but still won’t bother to teach there children any part of our culture.

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  90. am so proud to be Puerto Rican. Born in Kings County Hospital. Brooklyn. 1962.

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  91. Es un gran orgullo la bandera de PR, q nos identifica n l Mundo, pero no nos da derecho a menospreciar a los que nos mantiene por muchos Años quemando la de USA hoy en el área dl Condado San Juan PR, Hipócritas

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  92. Reblogged this on Never.Too.Broken and commented:
    Que Viva Puerto Rico!! Sad to know how “DEEP” the purpose was that created the tradition of the Puerto Rican Parade. Que Bonita Bandera!! Learning this, I will absolutely celebrate with deeper pride every year from here on out for MY BEAUTIFUL PUERTO RICAN ANCESTORS AND PEOPLE!!!

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  93. QUE VIVA PUERTO RICO HOY MAÑANA Y PARA SIEMPRE

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  94. Wow my grandmother told me a similar story when I was just a child almost 50 years ago, while reading this article I became very emotional. Sometimes in life we get so caught up in surviving and trying to get ahead that we forget those who paved the way for us. I’m very grateful to you for this history lesson……I am very proud of where my parents came from, so I say today teach your children the value of being bilingual and the benefits that come with it……God Bless Our Beautiful Island and Our Beautiful Flag…….I Am So Proud To Be Puerto Rican……

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  95. We are here to stay. The membership to this club (USA) has been paid in many, many ways. It is not a matter of being wanted by them or seeking their approval. The tenure has been earned…

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  96. G
    racias por reescribir una parte de nuestra historia tan importante para el desarrollo y crecimiento de estas nuevas generaciones que no han vivido en carne propia las injusticias hacia nosotros como puertorriqueños y como seres humanos.

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  97. I left an earlier post. I would like to leave another. I was born in Vega Baja, PR and was brought to Brooklyn, NY when I was merely 18 months old so that Brooklyn is my hometown but Puerto Rico is in my blood and always will be. I am completely bilingual and bicultural and love it in its entirety. But I will never ever deny my roots. I could not trade it for any other. I was confronted by some prejudices but never anything close to my ancestors (all Puerto Ricans) who came before me to the “mainland”.

    I was so happy to have had the opportunity to read and educate myself as to how the Puerto Rican day parade of 5th Ave in NYC came about. I also, felt the pain and the anger and the confusion that my ancestors must have felt at that time. We have come a long way but we have so much farther to go.

    Thank you for the information which was posted and for educating us.

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  98. Que Bonita Bandera, que bella isla, que humilde nuestra gente, que linda nuestra musica, que deliciosas nuestras comidas y ricas nuestras costumbres y nuestra musica que llena el alma. Pa’ lante boricuas, Pa’ lante siempre.

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  99. Luis Angel Beltrán, My parents also preached speaking both languages will be advantages, in time! They were so right, we as a culture need to be representatives of those that paved the way! Que Viva Puerto Rico Y nuestra bandera, Que VIVA!

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  100. How sad it must have been for those Puerto Rican living in this land and not being able to express their love for their and and flag.

    Thank you for that touching story……

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  101. Never knew the true meaning, i knew of the independence of the island, but not in this depth. My grandparents migrated from umacao back in the day to the south Bronx. Growing up never knew why the parade was so important. Viva Puerto Rico!!!

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  102. Thank you very Much for all the Information it is very good , Thank you love every word always good to alot of the pasty . I was one of the people who went through some of those things, way back when.

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  103. I am so Happy That My Mother and My Uncles came to New York City. In the 1950’s. My Mom had me in 1954@ Knickerbocker Hospital. @110th. Street In Convent Ave in Manhattan. As I tell everyone I am from the Bronx the truth is I was born in Manhattan raised in the Bronx. I experienced rasism first hand. We Were the First Puerto Rican Family to move Into Little Italy the Bronx. The Fordham Bald Eagles came for my 2 brother’s. Now how the Hell do you figure 2 Against at least 50-60 Or More Gang Members. Wow.

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  104. ES VERDADERAMENTE CIERTO QUE CUÁNDO UNO LEE ÉSTAS COSAS DE NUESTRA HISTORIA DE PUERTO RICO HACEN LLORAR A UNO ESPECIALMENTE CUÁNDO SE DICE LO DÉ LA BANDERA, Y HOY DÍA QUE CON TANTO ORGULLO PODEMOS CELEBRAR NUESTRO DÍA DEL DESFILE LOS FESTIVALES LA TRADICIÓN QUE CON TANTA EMOCIÓN ESPERAMOS ESE DÍA QUE DÍOS BENDIGA NUESTRA ISLA NUESTRA HISTORIA NUESTRA GENTE LA SOCIEDAD AMÉN, AMÉN.

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  105. Gracias por esta informacion. Sere Boricua hasta que muera. Gracias. Es un honor.

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  106. Wow I just learned something very valuable to my Puerto Rican culture and it is true when I hear either.or song it brings years to my eyes and chills to my spin. I’m proud to call myself a Puerto Rican. QUE VIVA PUERTO RICO MI ESLA DE ENCANTO. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  107. I Mexican and a proud Latino ” Que Viva Puerto Rico baby! “

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  108. I love PR the flag is beautiful but it’s a shame that the injustices of the past has lead to so much exgagerated Bull Shit!!!!!! A good history of the injutices suffered by the American occupation and the Puerto Rican opposition needs to be written, not one based only on the injustices suffered by the Puerto Rican people. Many of these laws were on the books and never enforced, not all state side people hated PR’s I was born state side in NY in 1931, much of the hatred for the US is unfounded we have suffered prejudice, nothing that which was suffered by our Black brothers and sisters.

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  109. I enjoyed The Puerto Rican Day Parade Today. June 14, 2015. God continue blessing ALL the Puerto Ricans all over the World and their beautiful FLAG.

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  110. Wow! I never knew this. Great story to tell our future Puerto Rican children!

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  111. Beautiful and very informative! I got choked up reading it, very eloquently written. We are a very proud group. I’m proud of my heritage! Y la bonita bandera de la preciosa, el encanto Puerto Rico, mucho orgullo y amor!

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  112. I am proud to be an American of Puerto Rican Heritage!

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  113. My father was in that first parade and subsequent others. He spoke of those who came in the 40’s and 50’s as pioneers who paved the way and took all the hard knocks. When he retired to Florida he returned for the parade as an elder sitting on the podium with others like him. He spoke of the hardships when pressed but never whined or complained. It was the lot of those displaced trying and striving for a better future. Something future waves of immigrants would encounter and experience as did the Irish and countless others before us.

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  114. Wow,,, amasing that hardly anyone knows about this history, first time I hear about it… I’m shocked!

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  115. i have learned something today, i am very proud to be a puertoriquena.

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  116. Pingback: Puerto Rican Flag: Source Of Pride, But Did You Know In 1948 It Was Illegal To Own One | ctlatinonews.com

  117. I never knew this part of our history. Born and raised in NY, it was very important for my mom & dad that I speak English correctly, but also speak Spanish just as well. Now that they are both gone, I feel the need to connect even more to my roots.

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  118. Amazing piece! Now I understand why so many Puerto Ricans want to display the Puerto Rican flag with so much passion.

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  119. I spent my young life in Boston, and it was hell for us,seeing the police destroy our parades and put us in jail.

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  120. Thank-you for explaining this important part of Puerto Rican history! What an awful thing to have to go through just because you had a flag…. Yikes! So happy to be able to understand why the Puerto Rican parade brings such patriotism, love and togetherness!

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  121. Enjoy the parade today I know its gonna b great. Have fun my plps!!!! Just b safe & enjoy the food its great.

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  122. Thank you for sharing this knowledge about my beautiful flag.

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  123. Grasias por este documentario de lo que significa la parada, ahora entiendo de donde vino este amor para mi preciosa bandera y ahora se de donde vino Nuestra tradition de la parada y de poner nuestra bandera en al to en donde quiera, no importa si hasta en la luna. Compartire en mi pagina, y pues claro con mis hijos.

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  124. The Puerto Rican flag is beautiful I live in Vermont and I’m not ashamed of showing it on my hat.
    I wish I had time to attend the Parade this year. Rita Moreno is and will always be an inspiration to other Puerto Rican artist.

    Liked by 1 person

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